Mountain West Photography: Blog https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog en-us (C) Mountain West Photography mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Sat, 30 Oct 2021 21:59:00 GMT Sat, 30 Oct 2021 21:59:00 GMT https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/img/s/v-12/u737971759-o719025832-50.jpg Mountain West Photography: Blog https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog 80 120 Fixing Halos and Dark lines in Photographs https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/10/fixing-halos-and-dark-lines-in-photographs For all you landscapers our there....Last weekend, I learned a technique to remove those pesky halos and dark lines in my landscape photographs.   I have been applying it to my landscaping editing. Works well and saves a lot of time.

Often I get White Halos and Dark lines against high contrast areas during editing. Try this:

  1. Use the clone tool to fix this.. but not in the normal way. For skies, you typically get a white line. Select the clone tool and change the mode to "Darken". Set opacity to say 20 - 30% and flow to 100.

  2. Sample (alt on PC), a spot nearby the halo line at the darkens you want (or to follow lines).

  3. Set a soft brush (can be larger than the halo and just go over the halo area. It typically won't affect other side of line. It just darkens areas that are lighter than the sampled point. This lets you quickly just go over the halo line roughly (as you get better you can increase opacity) and it fixes it quickly.

  4. Similarly, if you want to remove the dark line on the other side, set the mode to "Lighten", sample near the dark line and start to clone. It will only lighten areas darker than the sampled line.

This technique has saved significant time when I find I have this issue. This is also used to fix skin imperfections by lightening age spots, and other imperfections without completely deleting them.

Anyway, I hope this helps others!!

 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Halo Photoshop Techniques https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/10/fixing-halos-and-dark-lines-in-photographs Sat, 30 Oct 2021 16:15:16 GMT
Updating my Truck for Overlanding and Photography Workshops https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/4/updating-my-truck-for-overlanding-and-photography-workshops Updating my Truck for Overlanding and Photography Workshops

 

I am a Colorado Landscape Photographer.  I’ve taken many adventures in my truck.  I like to go to the back country both personally and to teach Photography Workshops.  However, I was getting tired of either moving in/out of hotels, or setting up at tent and packing up early in the morning for sunrise.  As you can imagine it takes a while to get there, and the roads aren’t conducive to a normal trailer.

I did a fair amount of research online and found two major options, modifying my truck, or purchasing a new breed of trailer called an overlanding trailer.  These trailers come in multiple flavors, some with a Roof Top Tent (RTT) and another that is a teardrop small enclosed space.  Both can be equipped with a galley, power and really whatever your heart desires, at a significant price.  The RTT models are typically in the $6K - $7K range for starters.  The teardrop ones start at $10K - $11K and up (to $20 - $30K).

After thinking about this for a while, I decided to pursue the truck modification method with a Roof Top Tent, Roof Rack, and pull-out drawers in the back of the truck.  I am actively working these now.  I will continue to add to this blog as I finish each of the components of the build.  The negative of this solution is that you have to pack up in the morning heading out for sunrise shots.  This takes about 10 minutes where the trailer method, you basically just lock up and leave.

A Place to Live on the Road

Roof Rack:           My first item to purchase/ build was a roof rack on my Leer Camper shell.  First, I called Leer and found that my truck shell can take ~500 lb load on the top.  This is enough for two, the tent and our dog Riley.  I shopped around and found, much to my chagrin that a roof rail system, standoffs, rods and mounting hardware would set me back ~$1000 installed.  I found my first project to build myself.  After a bit of research, I found a few builds that made their own roof rack, but nothing that really fit my need.  The one I liked most used a product called Unistrut/Superstrut.  These are high strength steel channels used to mount electrical and plumbing typically in commercial settings. You can find these at the big box stores along with all the mounting hardware.  What I liked most was this was a system with many different mounting options allowing me to later add an awning, traction boards or whatever else I needed easily.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Superstrut-10-ft-12-Gauge-Half-Slotted-Metal-Framing-Strut-Channel-Silver-Galvanized-ZA12HS10EG/202714274

Superstrut comes in multiple sizes and finishes.  I purchased the 10’ galvanized option.  I used the 7/8” 14g option for the mounting rails and the 1 5/8” for the crossbars.  If you get a larger 4-person tent, you will need 3 crossbars.  Just two crossbars for the 2 – 3-person tent.  One 10’ for the rails, and one 10’ for the crossbars is typically sufficient (you will need to confirm this with the size of your tent and mounting options.

My firsts step was to cut the Superstrut and finish it.  Cutting is easy with a saws-all, a hack saw if you have to or a jig saw.  I cut the crossbars to be 5’ basically cutting the 1 5/8” in half.  The rails need to be cut to fit the length of your shell.  Each is different.  Just make sure you don’t interfere with any lighting, antennas or go over any of the edge curves.  Once I cut these out, I needed to finish them.  Galvanized material doesn’t paint well unless you use a self-etching primer.  I used the Rust-oleum as shown in the picture.  I used auto undercoating on top for a black finish.  It looks quiteprofessional. 
 

My next issue was mounting the rails to the Leer camper shell.  I found out that my shell was curved from the front to the back, as well as side to side.  The Superstrut is very rigid and bending wasn’t an option.  So, I needed to create a “shim” to adapt a flat surface to the shell.  I made a quick trip to my local Restore store (a used building material store) and purchased a piece of composite decking.  You don’t need much, just something flat.  I then located the rails on my shell in the correct positions. Make sure the rails are parallel and are straight front to back.  Based upon discussions with some local installers, they recommended 17” from the center line making a 34” space between rails.  Make sure you look at the mounting of the Roof Top Tent to give you some space to mount the tent.  This worked for me, but may not work for you.  I cut a few pieces of wood the correct length to space the two rails while I was working on this.  To create a shim located a piece of the material (1 5/8” wide) below the rail and shim it underneath till it is flat against the rail.  Then measure the maximum gap at the ends and create a small block of wood this size.  Place a pencil on the block of wood and then trace the outline on the side of the composite material.  Repeat this for the other side.  You will typically need a band saw to cut this shim, though a saber saw may work though these are hard to hold.  Once you have the bottom cut, you will need to angle the top to the angle of the roof line.  It took a few times to do this for me. I put the shims on the roof and then put a level on them looking for gaps.  This is approximate and extreme accuracy isn’t necessary. The left figure below shows the top angled driver to passenger.   The right figure is the curve for front to rear.

 

 

 

Now I was ready to mount all this to the roof.  Drilling holes in the roof is the scariest part of this build.  You don’t want to create a leek in this shell.

I talked to some friends and we came up with a good solution.  I used Dicore rubber roof repair on the bottom and then tub/bath silicone in all the holes.  I used 3/8” bolts with a large fender washer and locking nuts on the bottom spaced 6” – 8”.  I taped all the pieces in place prior to drilling to make sure that nothing moved while I was drilling.  I added a bolt each time I drilled to make sure nothing moved.  The pictures below show some of this build.  Be careful not to over tighten the bolts as  you can crack the shell. It is quite difficult to tell the thickness of the camper shell.  Typipcally the middle has a honeycomb core and is quite thick.  I purchased an assortment of 1” – 2.5” 3/8 bolts and figured out which one worked when I did the install.

   

 

 

Once the rails were mounted and the sealant dried, I mounted the crossbars on the rails.  I found that I needed some additional space between the camper shell and the crossbars for tool/hand access to mount the roof top tent.  You will need some spacers.  My current solution is a series of large fender washers ~ 1.5” stack between the rail and the crossbars.   You  can use a piece of Unistrut here also.  You will need sufficient spacing to mount the Roof Top Tent.   Superstrut uses either cone nuts or spring nuts to position these easily and so they don’t move.  The 7/8” channel requires the nylon cone nut.  The 1 5/8” can use spring nuts.  These are not locking nuts so lock washers will be necessary.  Just put a bolt with a lock washer and larger washer through the crossbar slots and bolt into the cone nut.  Make sure your length isn’t too long and bottoms out on the channel.  You can avoid the bottoming out issue if you use 1 5/8” channel for the rails.

Another modification  you may consider is purchasing the Unistrut covers that will provide a plastic slide area when you put your RTT on top.  I haven’t done t his yet as it is a bit challenging to find and expensive.

You now have a fully functional roof rack system for about $75

 

Roof Top Tent:


 

There are many RTT options based upon the number of people you want to house and your price-point.  I have a friend with a iKamper and they love it.  The price-point was just too much for me.  I purchased a Smittybuilt Gen 2 RTT.  I waited for a sale and got 10% off and a free awning.  This ran me ~$1000 for the tent.  I was told by the representative that the Smittybuilt and the Thule tents were made by the same manufacturer.  I don’t know if this is true, but I do know that the Thule Insulation package fits great in the Smittybuilt tent.  Coincidence?  I don’t know, but it worked. As a modification, I had to replace the Stainless steel bolts with longer bolts to go around the crossbars.  Make sure you get the exact same head size for the bolt.   I also replaced the locking nuts with clamping handle nuts with through holes to make install easier.  This does require locking washers and is a bit more risky for people to easily steal the tent.  I left one bolt with a locking nut to make things a bit harder.

 

Mardatt 15Pcs M4 Star Knob Clamping Handle Nut Through Hole Set Brass Female Threaded Handle Screw On Knob Grip Black Plastic

The Awning:

My next install was the awning.  The awning kit came with mounting brackets.  All I had to do was bolt the angles on the Superstrut and basically I was done.  I purchased a long, 8’ awning and realized that I wanted some additional support.  A bit of scrap aluminum with 45 degree  tabs on the end did the trick.  I drilled a hole in the side of the unistrut and mounted the other side with a bolt in the T slot.  Make sure you leave enough room for hands where the RTT mounts.  I didn’t really leave enough but it works. There is still enough room to add some right angles and some verticals for traction boards.. but that will be next!

 

 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) colorado landscape photographer diy roof rack Mountain West Photography overlanding roof top tent https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/4/updating-my-truck-for-overlanding-and-photography-workshops Fri, 16 Apr 2021 22:01:21 GMT
Remnants of Fallen Giants https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/remnants-of-fallen-giants  

Along Davison road in the National Redwood Forest, lies a rugged, mountainous primordial redwood forest where little light reaches the forest floor. Ferns cover the ground and remnants of trees fallen over the millennium grow ivy and mushrooms as they slowly decay back into the soil. I find this place magical and it gave me real peace filling all senses. We took images in the morning hours with light beams hitting the rising mist from the forest floor. We felt as though we should see specks of light as fairies flitted about.  Purchase images here:  Remnants of Fallen Giants
 

Remnants of Fallen GiantsRemnants of Fallen GiantsAlong Davison road in the National Redwood Forest, lies a rugged, mountainous primordial redwood forest where little light reaches the forest floor. Ferns cover the ground and remnants of trees fallen over the millennium grow ivy and mushrooms as they slowly decay back into the soil. I find this place magical and it gave me real peace filling all senses. We took images in the morning hours with light beams hitting the rising mist from the forest floor. We felt as though we should see specks of light as fairies flitted about. Print ratio: 1.54. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) . Colorado Landscape Photographer Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/remnants-of-fallen-giants Sun, 14 Feb 2021 14:00:00 GMT
Emerald Cascade https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/emerald-cascade On the North Side of Mt Tamalpais lies a series of fresh water reservoirs. Feeding Alpine lake is a small stream with a series of waterfalls buried deep in a canyon. Getting here is half the fun driving windy mountain roads with grazing cows and sheep along the way. The canyon walls are steep and rain drenched. Little light makes it down to the bottom of these canyons even during the day. Lush ferns and moss covered rocks line this small canyon. The smell of this rain drenched forest is intoxicating. The first falls is called Cataract Falls, and is only about 1/2 mile in along the trail.  Purchase this image here:  Cataract Falls


ScerenityScerenityOn the North Side of Mt Tamalpais lies a series of fresh water reservoirs. Feeding Alpine lake is a small stream with a series of waterfalls buried deep in a canyon. Getting here is half the fun driving windy mountain roads with grazing cows and sheep along the way. The canyon walls are steep and rain drenched. Little light makes it down to the bottom of these canyons even during the day. Lush ferns and moss covered rocks line this small canyon. The smell of this rain drenched forest is intoxicating. The first falls is called Cataract Falls, and is only about 1/2 mile in along the trail. Print Ratio: 1.78. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/emerald-cascade Fri, 12 Feb 2021 07:45:00 GMT
New Image: Forest Cathedral https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/new-image-forest-cathedral Along Davison road in the National Redwood Forest, lies a rugged, mountainous primordial redwood forest where little light reaches the forest floor. Ferns cover the ground and remnants of trees fallen over the millennium grow ivy and mushrooms as they slowly decay back into the soil. I find this place magical and it gave me real peace filling all senses. We took images in the morning hours with light beams hitting the rising mist from the forest floor. We felt as though we should see specks of light as fairies flitted about.   Purchase it here:  Forest Cathedral

Forest CathedralForest CathedralAlong Davison road in the National Redwood Forest, lies a rugged, mountainous primordial redwood forest where little light reaches the forest floor. Ferns cover the ground and remnants of trees fallen over the millennium grow ivy and mushrooms as they slowly decay back into the soil. I find this place magical and it gave me real peace filling all senses. We took images in the morning hours with light beams hitting the rising mist from the forest floor. We felt as though we should see specks of light as fairies flitted about. Print Ration 1.52. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photographer Colorado Landscape Photogrpahy Mountain West Photography Updated Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/new-image-forest-cathedral Wed, 10 Feb 2021 19:35:54 GMT
New Image: Horsetail Falls https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/new-image-horse-tail-fall Near the very small town of Ames Colorado outside of Telluride, two small waterfalls cascade down the Lake Fork River. This canyon is lined by old mining clams, some are still active. Hiking through this area we found substantial abandoned equipment and found this great waterfall down one very bumpy road. Lined with Pine and Aspen, and hanging out a bit over the cliff, you could capture this image of the fine strands of the water.

Check out this image and other Colorado Landscape Photography here: Horsetail Falls


Print Ratio: .667:1
Example Print Sizes
S: 10.1 x 15.2 size E
M: 16.3 x 24.5 size H
L: 24.5 x 36.7 size M
XL: 31.6 x 47.4 size Q
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

Colorado Landscape PhotographerHorse Tail FallsNear the very small town of Ames Colorado outside of Telluride, two small waterfalls cascade down the Lake Fork River. This canyon is lined by old mining clams, some are still active. Hiking through this area we found substantial abandoned equipment and found this great waterfall down one very bumpy road. Lined with Pine and Aspen, and hanging out a bit over the cliff, you could capture this image of the fine strands of the water. Print Ratio: .667:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/new-image-horse-tail-fall Sun, 07 Feb 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: The Cabbage https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/the-cabbage Taken at Bisti Badlands south of Farmington in Northern New Mexico, this formation is a field of circular shaped rocks. Each has a unique look. Black and White image.  Check out this image and other Southwest Landscape Photography here: The Cabbage

 

The cabageThe cabageTaken at Bisti Badlands south of Farmington in Northern New Mexico, this formation is a field of circular shaped rocks. Each has a unique look. Black and White image. Print Ratio .667:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
Print Ratio .667:1
Example Print Sizes:
S: 10 x 15.4 size E
M: 16.1 x 24.8 size H
L: 24.2 x 37.2 size M
XL: 31.2 x 48 size XL
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/the-cabbage Fri, 05 Feb 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Frozen Veins https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/new-image-frozen-veins A bit of an abstract art from Bisti Badlands in Northern New Mexico. This was a small frozen stream we jumped across in early morning. We were out scouting some new locations for future workshops and enjoyed the desolate beauty of Bisti Badlands.  Check out this image and other Southwest Landscape Photography here: Frozen Veins

 

Frozen VeinsFrozen VeinsFrozen Veins: A bit of an abstract art from Bisti Badlands in Northern New Mexico. This was a small frozen stream we jumped across in early morning. We were out scouting some new locations for future workshops and enjoyed the desolate beauty of Bisti Badlands.
Print Ratio: 1.5:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link:
Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
Print Ratio: 1.5:1
Example Print Sizes:
S: 10.1 x 15.2 size E
M: 16.3 x 24.5 size H
L: 24.5 x 36.7 size M
XL: 31.6 x 47.4 size XL
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/new-image-frozen-veins Wed, 03 Feb 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Eggs and Bacon https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/new-image-eggs-and-bacon  

Taken at Bisti Badlands south of Farmington in Northern New Mexico, this formation is a field of egg shaped rocks on pedestals in front of rock cliffs. Looks like eggs and bacon to me. Black and White image. Check out this image and other Southwest Landscape Photography here: Eggs and Bacon

Eggs and BaconEggs and BaconTaken at Bisti Badlands south of Farmington in Northern New Mexico, this formation is a field of egg shaped rocks on pedestals in front of rock cliffs. Looks like eggs and bacon to me. Black and White image. Print Ratio 1.6:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

Print Ratio 1.6:1
Example Print Sizes:
S: 9.8 x 15.7 size E
M: 15.8 x 25.3 size H
L: 23.7 x 37.9 size M
XL: 30.6 x 49 size XL
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/2/new-image-eggs-and-bacon Mon, 01 Feb 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Desolate https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-desolate Taken in Upper Antelope Canyon in the Fall of 2019 in Page Arizona. With a Navajo guide I visited three slot canyons, Rattlesnake, Owl, and Upper Antelope canyons. These slot canyons are quite narrow and ribbons of light penetrate down through the sandstone creating brilliant colors and patterns across the canyon walls created over the millennia. "Excellent Image" at the Colorado State Print competition.  Desolate

DesolateDesolateTaken in Upper Antelope Canyon in the Fall of 2019 in Page Arizona. With a Navajo guide I visited three slot canyons, Rattlesnake, Owl, and Upper Antellope canyons. These slot canyons are quite narrow and ribbons of light penetrate down through the sandstone creating brilliant colors and patterns across the canyon walls created over the millenium. "Excellent Image" at the Colorado State Print competition. Print Ratio: 1.43:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
Print Ratio: 1.432:1
Example Sizes:
S: 10.3 x 14.9 size E
M: 16.6 x 24.1 size H
L: 24.9 x 36.1 size M
XL: 32.2 x 46.6 size XL
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-desolate Sat, 30 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
David Snyder awarded Platinum Photographer of the year in 2020 International Print Competition https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/david-snyder-awarded-platinum-photographer-of-the-year For those who are not familiar with Professional Photographers of America's International Print Competition it is kind of like the Olympics of Photography. Each photographer can submit up to 4 images each year in competition. Last year, my first year, I merited one image. Think of this as a "B" internationally. Now that this years results have been published I can finally show my entries that won awards this year. All four of my images submitted were accepted and three of those was chosen to be in the prestigious Loan collection (Think of this as an "A"). This level of achievement earned my a Platinum Medal under PPA Rules. I was one vote away from the Diamond level! This competition is rigorous. In 2020, I am one of only 37 Platinum photographers of the Year internationally.

A panel of 36 eminent jurors from across the United States selected the top photographs from over 5,000 total submitted entries at PPA headquarters in Atlanta. Judged against a standard of excellence, 1,706 images were selected for the General Collection and 865 (roughly 17 percent) were selected for the esteemed Loan Collection—the best of the best. The Loan Collection images will all be published in the much-anticipated "Loan Collection" book by Marathon Press.

The level of the award is determined by how many of those four images receive the highest possible honor—acceptance into the PPA Loan Collection, which is displayed at photographic exhibitions, conventions, and other photography events. I was named a Platinum Medalist, meaning that three of their merited images entered the PPA Loan Collection.  Check out these images and other Colorado and SW Landscape Photography here: 

 

Canyon Visitor: Canyon Visitor

Outworldly:  Outworldly

Serpant's Tail: Serpan't Tail

To the Light: To the Light

About PPA:

Founded in 1868, Professional Photographers of America (PPA) is the largest and longest-standing nonprofit photography trade association. It currently helps 30,000 professionals elevate their craft and grow their business with resources, protection, and education, all under PPA’s core guiding principle of bridging the gap between photographers and consumers.


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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/david-snyder-awarded-platinum-photographer-of-the-year Thu, 28 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: First Rays of Morning https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/first-rays-of-morning Taken Near Telluride, Colorado in the fall of 2020.  The first rays of morning hit the top of D Peak and the clouds over top the San Juan Range in Western Colorado.  The early morning light illuminates the foreground aspens and scrub oaks in this amazing valley .  Check out this image and other Colorado Landscape Photography here: First Rays of Morning

Colorado Landscape PhotographerFirst Rays of Morningtaken Near Telluride, Colorado in the fall of 2020. Print Ratio: 1.5:1
. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
Print Ratio: 1.5:1
Example Print Sizes
S: 10.1 x 15.2 size E
M: 16.3 x 24.5 size H
L: 24.5 x 36.7 size M
XL: 31.6 x 47.4 size Q
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/first-rays-of-morning Tue, 26 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
Updated Image: Cold Sunrise https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/updated-image-cold-sunrise As my skillsets improve editing, I review previous images that I have processed in the past and re-edit them.  Cold Sunrise is a re-imagined image of hte Garden of the Gods and Pikes Peak from a few years ago.

After a snowstorm in the Rocky Mountains, and before the sun rises it can be bitterly cold (~-10 - -20 F). The snow sits atop the crevasses in the rocks and highlights the deep greens of the evergreen shrubs and cypress surrounding this formation. The pink light of the early sunrise contrasts with the indigo blues of the sky and shadows of Colorado. Check out this image and other Colorado Landscape Photography here:    Cold Sunrise
Colorado Landscape PhotographerCold SunriseAfter a snowstorm in the Rocky Mountains, and before the sun rises it can be bitterly cold (~-10 - -20 F). The snow sits atop the crevasses in the rocks and highlights the deep greens of the evergreen shrubs and cypress surrounding this formation. The pink light of the early sunrise contrasts with the perfect blue skies of Colorado.}
Print Ratio: 2:1. . You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

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Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

Print Ratio: 2:1
Example Sizes:
S: 8.8 x 17.5 size E
M: 14.1 x 28.3 size H
L: 21.2 x 42.4 size M
XL: 27.4 x 54.8 size Q
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography Updated Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/updated-image-cold-sunrise Sun, 24 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Country Roads https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-country-roads West Dallas Road in the San Juan Mountain, Colorado area is often less travelled as the large ranch signs tend to scare off people. The road connects to National Forest Land against the mountains, and is available for travel and hiking. Winding vistas of the mountains and freshly cut hay treat visitors to this area. Check out this image and other Colorado Landscape Photography here: Country Roads
 

Print Ratio: 1.5:1
Example Print Sizes:
S: 10.1 x 15.2 size E
M: 16.3 x 24.5 size H
L: 24.5 x 36.7 size M
XL: 31.6 x 47.4 size Q
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

Colorado Landscape PhotographerThe Winding RoadWest Dallas Road in the San Juan Mountain, Colorado area is often less travelled as the large ranch signs tend to scare off people. The road connects to National Forest Land against the mountains, and is available for travel and hiking. Winding vistas of the mountains and freshly cut hay treat visitors to this area. This image is a prestegious Loan image from the Professional Photographers of America. Print Ratio: 1.5:1
You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-country-roads Fri, 22 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Dreaming of Aspens https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-dreaming-of-aspens An abstract of an aspen forest. These images are taken while moving the camera along the path of the trees creating these dreamlike impressionist looks. Taken off of Last Dollar Road near Telluride Colorado in October at a recent workshop we held there in the San Juan Mountains.  

Check out this image and other Colorado Landscape Photography here: Dreaming of Aspens
Colorado Landscape PhotographerDreamy AspensAn abstract of an aspen forest. These images are taken while moving the camera along the path of the trees creating these dreamlike impressionist looks. Taken off of Last Dollar Road near Telluride Colorado in October at a recent workshop we held there in the San Juan Mountains.
Print Ratio: 1.5:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-dreaming-of-aspens Wed, 20 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Fall Dance https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-fall-dance Late on a fall day, undulating aspens near Telluride show off their fall beauty. We took a group of photographers at our fall workshop to the "dancing trees" near Telluride. We arrived a bit early that and enjoyed the fall air till the last few moments of sun kissed the hillside with warm light and a cool breeze. These trees are created by unstable soil which slowly slips down the hill. The trees slowly adjust and reach for the sky. The trees are located on the edge a massive snow slide area. This image earned a merit award in Colorado State Image Competition this year.  Check out this image and other Colorado Landscape Photography here:  Fall Dance
Print Ratio: 1.728
Example Print Sizes:
S: 9.4 x 16.4 size E
M: 15.1 x 26.5 size H
L: 22.7 x 39.7 size M
XL: 29.3 x 51.2 size Q
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
 

Colorado Landscape PhotographerFall DanceLate on a fall day, undulating aspens near Telluride show off their fall beauty. We took a group of photographers at our fall workshop to the "dancing trees" near Telluride. We arrived a bit early that and enjoyed the fall air till the last few moments of sun kissed the hillside with warm light and a cool breeze. These trees are created by unstable soil which slowly slips down the hill. The trees slowly adjust and reach for the sky. The trees are located on the edge a massive snow slide area. This image earned a merit award in Colorado State Image Competition this year.
Print Ratio: 1.728 You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-fall-dance Mon, 18 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Dream Reflection https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-Dream-Reflection A new image has been added to Mountain West Photography!


Near Telluride, Colorado, on the way to Lizard Pass, Cushman lake sits unassumingly on the East side of the highway hidden by a berm. The natural landscape shelters this small lake creating a mirror like surface most of the time. During fall, the reflections during sunset are stunning.   Check out this image here: Dream Reflection
 

Colorado Landscape PhotographerDream reflectionNear Telluride, Colorado, on the way to Lizard Pass, Cushman lake sits unassumingly on the East side of the highway hidden by a berm. The natural landscape shelters this small lake creating a mirror like surface most of the time. During fall, the reflections during sunset are stunning. Print Ratio: 1.5:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-Dream-Reflection Sat, 16 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Dream Reflection https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/dream-reflection Near Telluride, Colorado, on the way to Lizard Pass, Cushman lake sits unassumingly on the East side of the highway hidden by a berm. The natural landscape shelters this small lake creating a mirror like surface most of the time. During fall, the reflections during sunset are stunning. Print Ratio: 1.5:1
Example Print Sizes:
S: 10.1 x 15.2 size E
M: 16.3 x 24.5 size H
L: 24.5 x 36.7 size M
XL: 31.6 x 47.4 size Q
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

Dream Reflection
Colorado Landscape PhotographerDream reflectionNear Telluride, Colorado, on the way to Lizard Pass, Cushman lake sits unassumingly on the East side of the highway hidden by a berm. The natural landscape shelters this small lake creating a mirror like surface most of the time. During fall, the reflections during sunset are stunning. Print Ratio: 1.5:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/dream-reflection Thu, 14 Jan 2021 20:30:00 GMT
New Image: Aspen Brushstrokes https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-aspen-brushstrokes  

Heading up to Owl Creek Pass near Ridgeway Colorado, we turned a curve and a beautiful Aspen grove showed off it's colors. Print Ratio 1.5:1
S: 10.1 x 15.2 size E
M: 16.3 x 24.5 size H
L: 24.5 x 36.7 size M
XL: 31.6 x 47.4 size Q
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

Aspen Brushstrokes
 

Corner GroveAspen BrushstrokesHeading up to Owl Creek Pass near Ridgeway Colorado, we turned a curve and a beautiful Aspen grove showed off it's colors. Print Ratio 1.5:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-aspen-brushstrokes Tue, 12 Jan 2021 15:00:00 GMT
New Image: Tranquil Fall Stream https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/tranquil-fall-stream South of Ouray, Colorado,
a canyon leads up to Imogen Pass, Yankee Boy Basin and other amazing sights. Lower down on the road a stream meanders through he canyon lined by aspens. This is a time lapse image of this babbling stream line by red and yellow foliage. Print Ratio 1.5:1
Example Print Sizes:
S: 10.1 x 15.2 size E
M: 16.3 x 24.5 size H
L: 24.5 x 36.7 size M
XL: 31.6 x 47.4 size Q
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.


Colorado Landscape PhotographerTranquil Fall StreamSouth of Ouray, Colorado,
a canyon leads up to Imogen Pass, Yankee Boy Basin and other amazing sights. Lower down on the road a stream meanders through he canyon lined by aspens. This is a time lapse image of this babbling stream line by red and yellow foliage. Print Ratio 1.5:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/tranquil-fall-stream Sun, 10 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Painted Valley https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/painted-valley The San Juan Mountains in Colorado are a special place in fall. Sweeping vistas, jagged soaring peaks, beautiful groves of aspen mixed with Pine and babbling creeks flowing down the valleys. The aspens and mountains almost seemed painted as the sunrise grazes the mountains and the fall adorned hillside. This image was taken along East Dallas Road last year as part of a scouting expedition across the San Juan Mountain area. In the background is Mt Sneffels, a popular 14r that many will hike. Print Ration 1.89: 1
Example Print Sizes:
S: 9 x 17.1 size E
M: 14.5 x 27.6 size H
L: 21.8 x 41.4 size M
XL: 28.1 x 53.4 size Q
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
Colorado Landscape PhotographerPainted ValleyThe San Juan Mountains in Colorado are a special place in fall. Sweeping vistas, jagged soaring peaks, beautiful groves of aspen mixed with Pine and babbling creeks flowing down the valleys. The aspens and mountains almost seemed painted as the sunrise grazes the mountains and the fall adorned hillside. This image was taken along East Dallas Road last year as part of a scouting expedition across the San Juan Mountain area. In the background is Mt Sneffels, a popular 14r that many will hike. This image is a prestigious Loan image from the Professional Photographers of America. Print Ration 1.89: 1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1nxeWI3PONhXs41fGy8u679c5DlmGxS9rOis-EWzedao/edit?usp=sharing

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/painted-valley Fri, 08 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Heaven's Light https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-heavens-light Taken in Upper Antelope Canyon in the Fall of 2019 in Page Arizona. With a Navajo guide I visited three slot canyons, Rattlesnake, Owl, and Upper Antellope canyons. These slot canyons are quite narrow and ribbons of light penetrate down through the sandstone creating brilliant colors and patterns across the canyon walls created over the millenium. This image was awarded "Excellent " at the Colorado State Print competition, and awarded top honors (Loan image) in the Professional Photographers of America International Competition.
Print Ratio: 1.4:1
Example Sizes:
S: 10.5 x 14.7 size E
M: 16.9 x 23.7 size H
L: 25.4 x 35.5 size M
XL: 32.7 x 45.8 size XL
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
 

Heavens LightHeavens LightTaken in Upper Antelope Canyon in the Fall of 2019 in Page Arizona. With a Navajo guide I visited three slot canyons, Rattlesnake, Owl, and Upper Antellope canyons. These slot canyons are quite narrow and ribbons of light penetrate down through the sandstone creating brilliant colors and patterns across the canyon walls created over the millenium. Print Ratio: 1.4:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-heavens-light Wed, 06 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: House on Fire https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-house-on-fire A new image has been added to the Southwest and Utah Gallery!:  In southern Utah, near Blanding, a series of ancient Native dwellings like a canyon and streambed. At one, build below a large overhand, reflected light in the early morning lights up the overhang creating t his amazing visual effect. Print Ratio 1.54:1
Example Print Sizes:
S: 10 x 15.4 size E
M: 16.1 x 24.9 size H
L: 24.1 x 37.3 size M
XL: 31.1 x 48.2 size XL
Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
House on FireHouse on FireIn southern Utah, near Blanding, a series of ancient Native dwellings like a canyon and streambed. At one, build below a large overhand, reflected light in the early morning lights up the overhang creating t his amazing visual effect. Print Ratio 1.54:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/new-image-house-on-fire Mon, 04 Jan 2021 23:47:01 GMT
New Image: Last Dollar Aspens https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/last-dollar-aspens  

One of my favorite parts of the fall season, is the glow of the sunlight as it filters through the golden canopy of changing aspens. This combined with the smells of the leaves after they have fallen makes this season one of the most magical for me. This image is a view of new and old aspens along Last Dollar Road near Dallas Divide and Ridgeway Colorado during our Fall Workshop in the area in early October.
#photographyworkshop, #photographyworkshops, #fineartphotography, #fineart, #abstractart, #ig_photooftheday, #masters_in_photography, #visuelearth, #artofvisuals, #masters_in_artistry, #visitcolorado , #colorado ,#aspens ,#fallcolors ,#photography ,#landscape,#landscapephotography ,#fineartphotography ,#winteriscoming,#coloradolandscapephotographer,#mountainwestphotography



Colorado Landscape PhotographerLast Dollar AspensOne of my favorite parts of the fall season, is the glow of the sunlight as it filters through the golden canopy of changing aspens. This combined with the smells of the leaves after they have fallen makes this season one of the most magical for me. This image is a view of new and old aspens along Last Dollar Road near Dallas Divide and Ridgeway Colorado during our Fall Workshop in the area in early October.
Print Ratio: 1.55:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photogrpahy Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2021/1/last-dollar-aspens Sat, 02 Jan 2021 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Last Dollar Fall https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/12/last-dollar-fall  

A new image has been posted on Mountain West Photography!:  Travelling along Last Dollar Road from Dallas Divide to Telluride Colorado, you pass through some of my favorite Aspen lined forests. During fall, the roads are covered with the falling leaves and the sunset light filters through the leaves creating a warm glow across the forest. This is some of my favorite time in the Colorado Rockies.  Last Dollar Fall

#photographyworkshops#fineartphotography#fineart, #abstractart, #ig_photooftheday, #masters_in_photography, #visuelearth, #artofvisuals, #masters_in_artistry, #visitcolorado , #colorado ,#aspens ,#fallcolors ,#photography ,#landscape,#landscapephotography ,#fineartphotography ,#winteriscoming#coloradolandscapephotographer,#mountainwestphotography


 

Colorado Landscape PhotographerLast Dollar FallTravelling along Last Dollar Road from Dallas Divide to Telluride Colorado, you pass through some of my favorite Aspen lined forests. During fall, the roads are covered with the falling leaves and the sunset light filters through the leaves creating a warm glow across the forest. This is some of my favorite time in the Colorado Rockies. Print Ratio: .754. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1nxeWI3PONhXs41fGy8u679c5DlmGxS9rOis-EWzedao/edit?usp=sharing

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/12/last-dollar-fall Thu, 31 Dec 2020 14:00:00 GMT
Tell Me the Story About the Forest Again https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/12/tell-me-the-story-about-the-forest-again This image was a bit of a surprise. We were shooting along Last Dollar Road near Ridgeway Colorado this fall with our workshop near sunset. I was scouting different places along the road and took this image. I didn't think much about it. As I was post processing images I started working on the image and the light intrigued me. A story developed in my mind of a young aspen among the grove of adult aspens with the past generations at their feet. I remember my children always asking to hear stories over and over at bedtime. This used to be an oral tradition passed down by generations in our past... so, thus the genesis of the name of this image.

#photographyworkshops#fineartphotography#fineart, #abstractart, #ig_photooftheday, #masters_in_photography, #visuelearth, #artofvisuals, #masters_in_artistry, #visitcolorado , #colorado ,#aspens ,#fallcolors ,#photography ,#landscape,#landscapephotography ,#fineartphotography ,#winteriscoming,#coloradolandscapephotographer,#mountainwestphotography


Colorado Landscape PhotographerTell Me the Story About the Forest AgainThis image was a bit of a surprise. We were shooting along Last Dollar Road near Ridgeway Colorado this fall with our workshop near sunset. I was scouting different places along the road and took this image. I didn't think much about it. As I was post processing images I started working on the image and the light intrigued me. A story developed in my mind of a young aspen among the grove of adult aspens with the past generations at their feet. I remember my children always asking to hear stories over and over at bedtime. This used to be an oral tradition passed down by generations in our past... so, thus the genesis of the name of this image. Print Ratio: .667. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/12/tell-me-the-story-about-the-forest-again Tue, 29 Dec 2020 14:00:00 GMT
New Image: Barn with a view https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/12/barn-with-a-view A new image for this year!  Taken this past October in the Telluride, Colorado area during our fall workshop. Mount Wilson towers behind open fields and aspen forests during this past fall season. Mount Wilson is in the Lizard Head wilderness area. This is a 5 image pano with amazing detail. Available in larger sizes
Colorado Landscape PhotographerBarn with a ViewTaken this past October in the Telluride, Colorado area during our fall workshop. Mount Wilson towers behind open fields and aspen forests during this past fall season. Mount Wilson is in the Lizard Head wilderness area. This is a 5 image pano with amazing detail. Available in larger sizes. This image is a prestegious Loan image from the Professional Photographers of America
Print Ratio 2.375. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/12/barn-with-a-view Sun, 27 Dec 2020 16:00:13 GMT
New Image: Twin Reflection: Colorado Aspens https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/12/twin-reflection-colorado-aspens Near Telluride on the way to Lizard Pass outside of Telluride Colorado, Cushman lake sits unassumingly on the east side of the highway hidden by a berm. The natural landscape shelters this small lake creating a mirror like surface most of the time. During fall, the reflections during sunset are stunning.  We went back twice to this magical lake to capture the imagery after sunset.  This is an unusual vertical Panoramic image with 6 images stacked vertically using a telephoto lens, rather than a wide angle lens.  The detail is spectacular allowing for very large images.  This tall print is perfect for a hallway or narrow wall.  This image is now available on my website along with many other new and exciting images.

 

Colorado Landscape PhotographerTwin ReflectionNear Telluride on the way to Lizzard Pass, Cushman lake sits unassumingly on the East side of the highway hidden by a berm. The natural landscape shelters this small lake creating a mirror like surface most of the time. During fall, the reflections during sunset are stunning. This tall print is perfect for a hallway or narrow wall. Print Ratio .428:1
. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/12/twin-reflection-colorado-aspens Fri, 25 Dec 2020 15:00:00 GMT
New Image: Sculpted https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/12/new-image-added Sculpted:  

One of the most interesting formations that I have ever visited has been White Pocket in Northern Arizona. The swirling red, white and gray sandstone formations are sculpted in amazing patterns. Over the millennia sand, wind and water have created this alien looking landscape. Check out this image and other Colorado Landscape Photography here: Sculpted

www.mountainwestphotography.com

SculptedSculptedOne of the most interesting formations that I have ever visited has been White Pocket in Northern Arizona. The swirling red, white and gray sandstone formations are sculpted in amazing patterns. Over the millennia sand, wind and water have created this alien looking landscape. Print Ratio: 1.5:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Colorado Landscape Photography Mountain West Photography New Image https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/12/new-image-added Wed, 23 Dec 2020 22:11:53 GMT
Showing and selling your Photography at Festivals https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/3/showing-and-selling-your-photography-at-festivals Showing and selling your Photography at Festivals 

By David Snyder

Almost 5 years ago, I decided to take my landscape and wildlife photography from a hobby to a profession.  I’ve been taking classes and workshops since my 20’s and have learned a lot.  I received encouragement from friends and family and I had significant marketing experience in my career.  So I thought, how hard can this be?

5 years later, I now understand I have more to learn than I already know.  As I don’t do portraiture work, I had to find a way to sell my work.  I have tried Facebook, galleries, festivals, direct cold calling, talking to art consultants, real estate agents, and networking.  I’m sure I haven’t done this all right, but I have learned.  However, the experience has been very rewarding and my work continues to improve significantly.  I hope some of these thoughts help you with improving your craft and selling your work.  Good luck !!.  Some overall do’s and Don’ts…. https://www.artworkarchive.com/blog/13-do-s-and-don-ts-to-stand-out-at-an-art-fair

Creating a portfolio

No matter what road you take, you have to create a coherent body of work to sell.   You have to decide what integrates your work? What type of clients are you looking for?  A collection of “random” images tends not to interest people walking by.  You will need a “wow” piece that brings people in that is prominent in your booth.  Once you have “found your voice” or figured out what you do, write it down.  You will need an artist’s statement (from 50 – 500 words depending on the show) to apply to festivals.  I recommend taking this statement and starting a document that contains all this type of data.  It makes it easier to apply to festivals and is consistent.

Starting an official business (LLC)

Before you read this section, I am not a lawyer, or an accountant.  The concepts provided below are what I did, and not what you should do.  I am not liable for issues arriving with your implementation of an LLC.  However, It is all pretty easy.  I’ve done 2 now.  The activities took about 2 hours to do everything below.. I mean everything… even going to the bank.  I personally don’t feel you need to pay someone to do this.

  1. Check to assure that your name isn’t taken:  Check here:  http://www.sos.state.co.us/biz/BusinessEntityCriteriaExt.do?resetTransTyp=Y&org.apache.struts.taglib.html.TOKEN=80f3abe1b5f3d4ea6e8252f07c76d7fa
  2. Recommend creating a unique email based upon this name either through Gmail, or through your provider.
  3.  Create an LLC with the State of Colorado (assuming you want to do this  here)  http://www.sos.state.co.us/biz/FileDocNameAvailCriteria.do?transTyp=ARTORG_LLC&org.apache.struts.taglib.html.TOKEN=80f3abe1b5f3d4ea6e8252f07c76d7fa    This costs $50 and is really the only expenses… other than ordering checks in this whole process
  4. Submit a request for an EIN (Tax number):  https://sa.www4.irs.gov/modiein/individual/index.jsp
  5. Recommend that you consider starting a Facebook page to document your business.. www.facebook.com/business
  6. Go to a bank (I use US Bank) and get a free checking, savings, debit and credit card.. basically no fees here at all
  7. Order business cards.. typically $20 out the door for 250.  I used www.Vistaprint.com.. wait for at least a 40% off sale.  Note that if you order 250, they give you a great deal on another 250 at the end of the checkout process.  Don’t order 250 right off the bat.
  8. You will need to file a Schedule C at tax time, however, as you are not a full incorporation, you will submit this as part of your personal taxes.

Improving your work

The quality of your photographic images will always improve with experience, mentorship and feedback.  I am a firm believer in learning from others.  Early on I went to college for photographic technical experience.  This helped me understand the fundamentals of photography.  Next I started with workshops which provided me the opportunity to network, get field experience, and learn in real lighting conditions.  I learned from some excellent nature photographers who have worked for Conde Naste, National Geographic, even Pulitzer Prize winning photo journalists.  For years, excellent photographer friends of mine, Doug and Laura Bennet tried to convince me to enter a photography professional organization and participate in Print competitions.  I was reticent to do this as I didn’t believe my work was “good enough”.  I quickly found that the entering completion, though frustrating at times, significantly improved my photographic eye (I didn’t take anywhere as many images), improved my editing and SW skillsets, and I met nationally renowned level landscape photographers and am proud to call them mentors.  In addition, I met other photographers that I could go out in the field with, develop workshops and industry contacts I would have never developed had I not started this process.

How to find festivals (Nationally and locally)

I had a friend who had been showing at festivals for years.  This accelerated this part of the process significantly.  First, I had to find out when and where were the festivals, how much they cost, and when do you apply.  The results where somewhat surprising, and expensive.. let me explain.  The higher end the festival, the more expensive it is, but also the earlier you have to apply.  The summer and fall shows typically have application due dates 6 – 9 months prior to the festival.  They are difficult to get into.  I have applied for one for 4 years.  Still haven’t made it in yet.  The other big surprise was cost.  I  used to have a woodworking business and showed at art and wine festivals.  I found that the shows were about $200 for a weekend.  Now $200 is a deal and most are $400 - $600 for a weekend show.

There are a few things I recommend looking for.  I typically apply to juried shows.  This means that somebody with at least some art experience is looking at the applications and cutting out those that resell items, are make cheap “crap”.  However, I have attended some juried shows that have comcast, real estate agents, political booths etc.  I stay away from those rows if I can.  Music festivals.  I tend to stay away from these as people come for the music and get drunk early.  Now, a show that sells beer and wine is typically good for vendors (till after 4:00), but the music scene makes this happen early and people get very drunk, don’t by and are generally a bother.

Here is a listing of where I find festivals and shows:

www.Zapplication.org, www.festivalnet.com, https://coloradoartisttour.com/

Specialty Shows:  Home shows, Garden Festivals, Log home shows, rodeos (yes, I have done those also).  Check out the major venue schedule and you will find just a ton of shows that might be targets for you.

Printing your work

                Find an excellent printer.  There are a few here in Colorado, but don’t be afraid to send work out to labs in the US.  You will need to download the .icc files from each printer.  You will need to calibrate your monitor and you will need to go back and forth for a while with the printer on test prints to get them to print out the way you want.  This can take a few months to get this right so make sure you leave enough time.  After you print with them for a while, you can expect discounts from 10% - 50% depending on the vendor.  I have visited all the printers that I use and talked to the staff myself.  I am picky about what my work looks like.

Colorado: www.duraplaq.com, www.reedphoto.com, www.cgproprints.com

US based printers (there are a ton of these so don’t take this as the best list)

Bay photo lab www.bayphoto.com

White House Custom Color:  www.whcc.com

                Magnachrome (metals)  www.magnachrome.com

Pricing your work

Before you start applying to festivals, you will need to come up with the dreaded pricing model.  I had no idea how to start this and cover all my expenses.  I’ll pass on what I was told, use it or not.  A gallery owner recommended that I use between 2.25 and 3 times my cost to create a print (printing the image, framing, etc…).  Matting and framing tend to be the biggest expense and tripling that expense can make your images just too much for people to buy.  So, the answer may be a sliding scale, or different depending on the vendors that you use.  Finding discounts for volume, high quality vendors that sell at a reasonable price is essential to make this work.

Getting a Booth setup


To apply to festivals, you need a picture of a booth completely setup.  This was a surprise for me initially.  You will need to make a few decisions.  Will you be doing only indoor shows or both indoor and outdoor shows?  Will you require electrical (e.g. how will you light your booth)?  By the way, you will need some type of lighting for your images.  Sunlight is too harsh and indoor lights are too dim.  If you are outside, the tent won’t let in enough light to illuminate your fine art images.  There are many places online to look.  Here is a pretty decent article: 
https://www.artsyshark.com/2019/02/27/art-fair-show-tips-booth-display/

Tents:  There are many options here but I highly recommend that  you stay away from the Walmart, amazon or Costco brands. The first big wind or rain storm and the tents blow away and your entire inventory is ruined.  Spend money here.  A good article can be found here:  https://www.artfairinsiders.com/profiles/blogs/on-purchasing-a-fair-festival-tent.  They recommend the Flourish Light dome tent.  This is the best tent on the market, however it is heavy, takes a long time to set up and is expensive.  I went with get under cover tents: https://getundercover.com/  Go for the commercial or professional tents.  They are in the $250 - $350 range for a tent

Weights so you tent doesn’t fly away.  There are many options here but you need about 40 – 50 lbs of weight.  Some make theirs out of PVC pipe and cement.  I went with the simple solution.  Canvas sand bags (4) for $10 and a bag of sand.  Home depot carries these: https://www.homedepot.com/s/festival%2520sand%2520bags?NCNI-5

Straps to hold down you tent to the bags (many shows won’t let you use stakes).  I bought adjustable straps at Harbor Freight.  Don’t buy the orange ones.  They look terrible in pictures.  Get white or black if you can.

Walls: There are so many options here, it is difficult to provide a recommendation.  You can spend a lot of money ($1500 easy) on pro panel walls and accessories.   I recommend looking for used equipment and purchase the best you can.  I made my first set as I am a woodworker.  Some people make them out of lattice.  Some tents have fabric walls that you can hang things from.

 

Art hanging system:  So, you have a tent, walls, and some prints.  Now you need to hang them up.  Sounds simple but you need an adjustable system that doesn’t tear up the walls.  Many people use drapery hooks.  Cheap, very adjustable, easy to get and are pretty sturdy.   This is a great idea:  https://www.pinterest.com/pin/524106475362148130/  a bit expensive, but they are very sturdy. Or you can make you own with some materials from your local home improvement store.

Lighting:  This has been the most vexing part of the process for me.  I have had 3 different lighting systems and I still don’t have the answer. You can’t count on getting electricity at every show so you need a capability to work off of batteries and to plug in.  One the better articles I have seen is here:  https://www.propanels.com/battery/  I am making my own system however there are great ideas in the article and for those who are less adventurous, a great solution.  Here is what I purchased:

Battery:  Interstate deep cycle marine batter 125 AH  31DC

Lighting Fixtures: 3 light track light: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Hampton-Bay-3-Light-44-in-White-R30-PAR30-Large-Step-Linear-Track-Lighting-Head-Kit-804759/310684162

Track light plug adapter: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Hampton-Bay-1200-Watt-White-Live-End-Linear-Track-Power-Feed-with-15-ft-Cord-Plug-and-Switch-804919/310684197

Light bulbs:  1000 lumen 60 degree, long neck Par30 bulb:  (12-Pack) Satco S9438 13PAR30/LN/LED/60'/4000K/120V/D 13W PAR30 Long Neck Indoor/Outdoor Dimmable LED 60° Flood Lamp (4000K)  pack of 12: https://www.amazon.com/Satco-13PAR30-LED-4000K-120V/dp/B01GK6G7TU/ref=sr_1_15?keywords=satco+4000k+led+par30&qid=1582840873&sr=8-15  you can get less, but you will need about 9 for a single booth.

Charger: Schumacher SC1359 6/12V Fully Automatic Battery Charger and 15A Maintainer.  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0789697JT/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Inverter: BESTEK 500W Pure Sine Wave Power Inverter DC 12V to AC 110V Car Plug Inverter Adapter Power Converter with 4.2A Dual USB Charging Ports and 2 AC Outlets Car Charger, ETL Listed  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082MDRC64/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Extension cables:  Common purchase

Outdoor Dimmer:  Otronics 800W Outdoor Dimmer for LED String Lights, Wireless Remote Control dimmer control,100Ft Range with 8 Brightness Mode, Timed off, Memory Function https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07KHWKVVX/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Cable Ties Common purchase

Lighting support system:  here is a decent one from propanel:  https://www.propanels.com/product/light-bars/  This heavily depends on  your wall system.  Your track lights could also be cable tied to your tent or wall stiffeners

Another overview article: https://hubpages.com/art/artist-display-lighting  This provides all types of solutions from the very cheap to the more advanced.

Submitting your work to festivals

OK, so you have a body of work, you have your business set up, and you have images that you feel can be used to sell.  Congratulations, you are ready to start the process.  To submit your work, you will need to create a few things. First you will need to upload your work.  There are size restrictions, resolution requirements, file size, recommended color space etc.  You will need a picture of your booth without any identifying marks (e.g. no banners and you should not be in the image).  Recommend that some of your work that you will show (in the submitted images) is also in the picture.  Jurors have recommended, no people, no desk, no banner, no garbage or debris on the floor, great lighting.  This means you realistically have to have a tent, wall, and have tried to set this whole thing up prior to ever applying to a show. This was a surprise to me and really delayed my submittals.

This may take a bit to upload, describe and price each of these images.  Next artists statement (see step one).  This describes your work. You will need 3 – 5 excellent examples of your work.  Each festival requires a different number of images.  You may need to get the license plate number of your vehicle, and/or trailer.  Typically, jury fees are $35 – 40 each to apply.   If you are approved, they will ask for the entire fee up front.  As a photographer, wall space is everything.  So, look for spaces that are either corners, or have spaces between booths so that you can put inventory on the outside wall

Inventory

Inventory is expensive to purchase.   You will need large and small items ($20 or less is great if you can create these), you will need examples of each type of media you sell (metal, plaq, paper, acrylic, etc.)   You can make test prints or small prints of each to provide this option.  Big prints, well lit bring people into the booth.  Fancy frames can be difficult to sell.  Everyone has different tastes.  However, provide examples (much like a framing store) on your options.  Matted, framed glass prints are selling as much now.  Acrylic and Metals tend to sell more.  Plaq Prints were very popular, but not as much lately.  If you have items that are not selling, or people aren’t interested, don’t hold onto these.  Sell them at cost, have a discount bin, or go to the affordable art festival and sell them yearly!

Preparing for a festival

  • Have a way to take credit or on-line payments
    • There are an amazing number of ways to take on-line payments (they are all free to set up by the way) Apple Pay, Samsung Pay, Android Pay, Zelle, Venmo, Paypal.. you get the idea
    • I also have square.  I paid the extra for a chip reader.  The magnetic version is typically free!

 

  • Insurance:  Yes, you will most likely need your own insurance to participate in a festival.  This is separate from what you already have.  I have used a couple of different ones:

Steve Burkholz:  Allstate  http://www.allstateagencies.com/HBurkholz/Welcome

ACT: https://www.actinsurance.com/compare-policies?gclid=CjwKCAiAy9jyBRA6EiwAeclQhNOOskqZcZsJT8OYlC1jScT0YKXV4aRhN64QOBsiHoqSjY-jQe2tLhoCLygQAvD_BwE

  • Sales Tax:  This is a complicated subject that you can write a whole paper on.  I’ll focus on Colorado as this is my home state.  Again, I am not an accountant, I am not a lawyer.  I am not responsible for any issues that you have with sales tax in the future due to the descriptions I provide below.  This only admires the challenges ahead.  It is not to be taken as guidance or a checklist on what to do.  Each festival is different.  Some festivals will ask you to write a check at the end of the festival to pay for the sales tax.  Some don’t.  Some cities have a “Home Rule” law that says they will collect sales tax separately (like boulder and Denver), others are good if you submit this with your regular taxes.  Each location is different.  Many festivals are identified as a “special event”.  You will submit sales taxes to each of these separately from your normal quarterly taxes.  Adding to the complexity is operating and selling in multiple states.  So, I’ll attempt to walk through each major concept starting with the state.  Confused yet?  Sorry, it is a learning process.

Colorado State Sales tax:  You will need a state sales tax license.  This website will “explain it” though it is clear as mud: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/tax/how-apply-colorado-sales-tax-license.  You can apply for a license here: https://www.colorado.gov/revenueonline/_/  ( look for the yellow/orange buttons). After that, go to the same page on the bottom and sign up for a login ID.   You will have to submit your taxes quarterly most likely.  Quarterly taxes are due:  1/20, 4/20, 7/20 and 10/20 each year.  Some cities allow the state to collect sales taxes for them, others collect their own.  You can look here: colorado.gov/pacific/tax/local-government-sales-tax to get a listing of those cities that are considered Home Rule.  You will need to most likely get separate licenses and submit separate tax forms to each of these.

 

Special event license:  Once you get a state sales tax license, you can get a “multiple event” Special Event License making it easy to submit sales taxes for each event (that is registered with the state)  Details are here: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/tax/how-apply-special-event-license.  Taxes are due the 20th of the month following the month in which the special event began.   These taxes are not included as part of your normal quarterly state or local sales tax.  If you happen to only do Special events, you could get away with only filing special event taxes as they collect for everyone.

 

Home rule cities:  You will need a separate license and submit a separate tax form (often with very different due dates from the state) each quarter.

 

Some tax recommendation:  As you can see the this is a very complex issue. 

You will need some very detailed tracking on each sale.

Separate out the taxes for each location and meticulously.You will need a way to add taxes for each “event

Track the dates for when taxes are due for each location in a calendar and watch this almost weekly so you don’t miss anything.

The state and some cities require you to file zero income forms (so even if you don’t make any money in a quarter, you still have the opportunity to submit a tax form)

Track all taxes paid and make sure that this is documented in your yearly federal taxes.

There are some additional rules around where you sell the image, and where it is going.If you sell and deliver at a show, charge tax based upon the show location.If you take an order once you get home and mail it/deliver it to another location.. well the tax implications are different

Before a show starts, read the materials the show organizer provides.Most likely they will explain the rates for the shows and a bit about sales tax.

Update any software (like square) with the correct sales tax before the show.

  • Tent (if you do outside work).  see above
  • Walls.  see above
  • Logo:  Develop a logo by yourself, using a designer, or use something like https://photologo.co/.  They make amazing logos at a very reasonable price.  I was able to take the basic logo and derive 6 different logos that I can use in different use cases.
  • Business Cards:  Vistaprint (and other).  These take about a week to get and they can take photoshop images.
  • A comfortable chair to sit in.  There is often long lulls and you will need a place to sit.  I have a director’s chair.
  • Packing material and a tape gun for the items you sell
  • Totes to put all your stuff in.  If it isn’t in a bag or tote, you will get very tired of carrying it.
  • Microfiber cloth for cleaning.  Your prints will get dirty and dusty.  Have a few cloths to clean off your items.
  • Packing materials for your prints.  OK this is a big item.  Prints get damaged very easily.  I am on my 3rd system to protect my images and it still isn’t working very well.   I have seen many different ways of doing this from wrapping in foam, to purchasing  double bubble reflective foil insulation from your local home store and creating large envelopes.  Someone even took the time to go to Harbor Freight and purchase a bunch of moving blankets and sewed them together to make envelopes.  In the end, expect breakage, scratches, dents, and sorrow.  It goes with the territory.
  • Getting there (truck, trailer etc..)
  • Dolly to transfer the tent, walls, and inventory to the festival.  This can be about a block at times.
  • Water, food
  • Sun tan lotion
  • Comfortable shoes

The Festival

So, you made it to your show!  Congratulations!!!  You will find every manor of vendor and client at shows.  Some people want to bargain and give you no money, some are scared to come in as many vendors almost jump on anyone who comes into your booth.  My recommendations are pretty simple. 

  • Setup is typically the day before or early in the morning.  First shows have many issues that you need to fix.  You forgot a ladder, you need scissors etc.  Arrive early and be prepared to be tired after setting up. Build up a box of these types of things you will need for each show.
  • You will need to figure out how you will get internet access to invoice/charge people.  Some shows have very poor internet, but provide wifi.  It is a good idea to have a few different ways (even using your phone as a hot spot) to provide connectivity for charges.  Ask these questions even before the show.  Most organizers have this answer already.  I have literally run around a show with my arm in the air attempting to get a signal.
  • Have everything in Totes.  No loose equipment.  Moving is a hastle and they don’t give you a ton of time typically with your car in the area.
  • Have an assistant when setting up.  You will need to move cars, all you stuff etc.  It is relatively secure, but have someone there in the beginning at least.
  • Arrive early before the show and meet the other vendors.  Check out what they have, check out what shows they like.
  • Make sure everything has a price on it.. even a small tag, though a bigger tag and a description is better for images
  • Declutter your booth.  Make it easy for a flow of people
  • When you sell something, have a way to wrap it, protect it, have bags, add a card in the bag, or on the back of your image.
  • For large prints, offer to help hang the print if they live nearby.  You can see other areas where prints might work for them.
  • Be prepared for requests for other prints that you don’t have there  Have access to a PC or tablet that you can show  your work that isn’t there.
  • Once the show starts: Have a story about each image, talk about emotion, talk about smells and sounds (for landscapes not people). 
  • Ask a lot of questions, don’t take over the conversation.
  • Don’t jump on people as they come in.. however welcome them if they stop by
  • I typically have some small images that I give away..  yes I give them away.  I just use COSTCO printing, and use scraps from my bin prints to frame some images of the American flag.  If I see a veteran, Fireman/woman, officer, I stop them, thank them for  their service and give them something.
  • Many people will ask you “how did you take that picture?”  I tell them.  There is little chance that they can do it themselves. 
  • Students often want to talk about photography.  I offer to provide them a writeup on their questions…. (I have 4 – 5 typical ones already prepared).  I however ask their parents first and give my card to the parents.
  • Ask the people if they have art now in their house, what do they like?  What is their color pallet, warms, cools, mixture.  I get “my house is full already” often.  I do suggest rotations with the seasons.
  • Don’t give one price for your images.  Provide ranges based upon size, framing, media.  Offer this to them.  Ask what size were they looking for?
  • Write down people’s name, look for a hook to send them more info and get contact information
  • The difficult part for many is discussing pricing.  Make sure you have a broad range.  Ask what they are looking for.  When you tell someone the price, often people almost apologize.. and reply back almost as a question… Don’t raise your voice at the end, say it as a statement.  Ask if this is the price range they are looking for.  Looking for more or less, provide options.
  • Closing a sale at a show can be challenging.  If you live nearby and they are looking at something larger, offer to bring a print by to show in their house.  If a spouse is missing, offer to join them in a skpe shopping call!! SKOPING!
  • Hand our hundreds of cards
  • Let people take pictures of your images.  Don’t wait for them to ask, offer it.  They can’t print something large with a cell phone picture and the lighting is all wrong anyway.  Offer to talk a picture of your card so they can’t loose it!

Following up on all your orders and questions

  • I typically have a notebook that has a list of every order (or I have an order sheet I fill out) with contact information, size, framing, media, contact info for the client (email, address, phone number). 
  • I take many names that I will follow-up with.  Write down details as you will meet 100’s or 1000’s of people over the show.
  • Send a note at least email, hand written is even better to every client.  They will remember this.
  • For each order, keep your clients informed on the progress of the order

 

I realized I have seven pages of notes here and I’m sure you are glazed over after 2 pages.  Good luck with your art festival and I will see you out there!

 

 

 

 

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Technique https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2020/3/showing-and-selling-your-photography-at-festivals Mon, 02 Mar 2020 22:12:48 GMT
Photographing the annual Sand Hill Crane Migration https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2016/6/photographing-the-annual-sand-hill-crane-migration   

 

Three years ago I met Michael Forsberg, the premier Midwest/grasslands photographer in the United States at a photography workshop in Jackson Hole Wyoming.  Aside from being a great person, and photographer, Michael has a true passion for preserving the grasslands and rivers that cover a vast area of the United States.  Less than 150 years ago, grazing herds of buffalo covered this immense area.  The rivers, full of spring runoff swelled the Platte River to miles wide at times.  Massive flocks of birds travelled across the plains on their way to summer nesting or winter feeding grounds.   Sand Hill Cranes have been migrating through the Platte River Basin for almost 10 million years (according to fossil records)

Much of this has changed, and not for the good.  The Platte River is all but dry now even in the spring as thirsty farmer’s fields divert the water.  The buffalo are all but gone and a single remaining large animal species, the San Hill Crane still migrates across this land.    I grew up near this land in Omaha NE.  I saw the crane migration when I was young, but I don’t’ remember it at all.  Something in the images and the descriptions of this migration ignited my interest.  I had to go and witness it myself.  I’m glad I did and I recommend that you find the time to witness this yourself.  You don’t need to be a photographer to witness the spectacle.

So, what is so interesting about seeing some large birds you might ask?  Think about 400,000 of these birds, about 3 ft tall, 6 ft wingspan and weighing about nine pounds apiece, all either calling at once or taking off at once in the morning.  I have never heard a sound like this in the past.  The sheer numbers of the cranes is amazing.

Armed with a bit of information, a 3 day reservation at a hotel and two viewing blind reservations at the Rowe Sanctuary, I headed off to Kearney Nebraska., the self-proclaimed “Sandhill Crane Capital of the World”.   From Colorado Springs, my GPS indicated a six hour ride.  I find I make too many stops for food, bio-breaks and photo opportunities.  We left at 7:00 AM, and didn’t arrive till about 3:00 PM.  My first blind reservation was a 5:00 PM so we had a few hours to drive around and explore the area.

Kearney is a typical Midwestern town with about 32,000 inhabitants and home to the University of Nebraska at Kearney.  To a Colorado boy, this land is flat.  No mountains to tell direction here.  There is a river that runs West to East (when it is flowing) .  This is the primary landmark of the area.  There are few trees, unless you are next to the river, else, it is what you expect… grassland.

We headed towards the river.  Most roads run North/South or East/West.  We headed for the trees and the river.  As we didn’t have reservations in the Rowe Sanctuary viewing blinds for every sunrise and sunset, we stopped at Fort Kearney for information.  Fort Kearny was founded in 1848 as an outpost for the US Army.  Now, it is a museum and visitor site for the local area. The people there are very friendly and happy to help with crane viewing, local restaurants, where to go during the day, or when things aren’t busy, anything else you want to talk about.  This is the Midwest.  The people here are friendly, open and eager to meet people.  I don’t think I met a rude person my entire time there.  We asked, where to go when we didn’t have a blind.   Most of the land along the river is private property, so there aren’t many viewing areas.    The closest to Fort Kearny is the Fort Kearny Recreation area.  There are great campgrounds here and for a small fee (you can purchase a day ticket at the Fort) you can park there and walk (1/2 mile) to the old railroad trestle that has been converted to a viewing bridge.  The second area is of course the Rowe Sanctuary located off Elm Island Road and right on the Platte River.  The final location is at the corner of Lowell Rd and Elm Island Rd just a few miles from the Rowe Sanctuary.  There is a viewing deck here and Elm Island Rd follows the river for about ½ mile with easy viewing of the river.  As neophytes to this spectacle we asked, “what are we looking for?” Crane SunsetCrane SunsetSunset over the Platte river in Kearney Nebraska as the Sand Hill Cranes return to the river to roost for the evening. Print Ratio: 1.51:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.

To answer this question, you need to know a little bit about Sand Hill Crane behavior.  The cranes come to this Midwestern area to rest up, fatten up for the long migration north, and mate.  San Hill Cranes mate for life and you will typically see bonded pairs with possibly one or two other immature birds with them.  The parents “show the way” to the juveniles each year.   In the morning, the cranes are on the river.  The Platte is wide, shallow and the water is slow moving.  There are many sand bars in the middle of the river.  This is where all the birds roost for the night.  It helps with protection from predators such as fox, raccoons, coyotes, wolves, cougars and bobcats. 10,000 – 20,000 birds will group together on a section of the river in a roost.  These roosts are amazingly loud.  Early in the morning, around sunrise the birds will take off, typically all at once.   You can often see this in the distance.  You see a black cloud of birds rising, then the next roost, then the next.  It is like a huge wave.  You see the wave before you hear it.  The train just gets louder and louder as it passes by and the birds cover the sky.  Before you know it, the mass assent is complete and the birds fly nearby to Platte River TangoPlatte River TangoAs part of the migration of the Sand Hill Cranes, the younger cranes pick a mate, which they keep for life. They will start this selection at the Platte river with "dancing"; leaping up in the air, spreading of wings, and throwing of their heads. Print Ratio 1.5:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
Example Sizes:
S: 10.1 x 15.2 size E
M: 16.3 x 24.5 size H
L: 24.5 x 36.7 size M
XL: 31.6 x 47.4 size Q

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
the fields to feed and “Dance”.  You have basically all day to watch the birds in the fields.  I don’t know there is a better or worse time.  However, you get up around 5:00 and have been standing for a few hours in the cold.  It is time for a big breakfast.  There are many great places to eat within 15 minutes of your viewing area.  So off we go.

3 Gear Down3 Gear DownThe Sand Hill Crane has an almost 6 foot wingspan for mature adults supporting their large bodies during their up to 10,000 mile migration. As they come in for a landing, the spread their wings, lower their legs and almost put down the flaps to slow themselves. We had endless enjoyment watching them come in for landings in the fields and rivers. Print Ratio: .639:1. You can get standard print sizes and select a size to order using the print ratio and entering into the following google sheets link: Print Sizing Spreadsheet

Custom sizes available upon request. See sizing and pricing page for additional details. Send a message for specific pricing.
Late mornings and afternoons are spent tracking down the birds in the fields.  They are on both the north and south side of the river, typically within a mile or so of their roosts.  The birds are in open fields.  They don’t mind cars coming nearby the field. They do mind people getting out of their cars with their phones up in the air chasing them in the fields.  They will fly away quickly if you try that.  Your car is a great viewing blind. Stay in it with the windows rolled down, the music turned off and the car turned off.   Enjoy the exhibition.  The birds are feeding on corn left over from the previous harvest.   This is a symbiotic relationship. The farmers don’t have to cleanup; the birds feed and “deposit” some fertilizer while they are there.  The farmers have more issues with crane viewers stopping in the middle of the road, and travelling on private property.  Pull of the road and respect property rights and everyone will be happy.  The interesting part of the day is when the young birds “Dance” as part of their mating ritual.  The two will jump high into the air throwing their heads back.   You will take a lot of pictures of the cranes.  Unless you have a good telephoto lens, most images won’t do this justice.  As the sun goes down, the cranes will often fly towards the river and roost very nearby still calling and milling about.  Just at sunset they will gather in large groups on the river.  Sunrise and Sunset are excellent times for photographing.  The sun will rise/set very close to the center of the river (if you pick the right spots).  However, this is often low light and the birds move about. You will need a camera with low light capability (ISO 1600 – 3200) with decent noise performance to shoot acceptable speeds catching the birds.  During the day, most cameras will do just fine.

What images to capture.  There are a series of images that you should strive to get.  In the morning,  of course the sunrise over the river is the shot to look for.  A few clouds make it all the better.  I would get to your location at least 1 hour prior to sunrise if not 1.5 hours.  There is enough light that time of day.  Images of the roost are great as the sun is coming up either as silhouettes or with the early morning golden sun reflecting off the river onto the birds.  The birds filling the skies are great images also.   During the day, images of birds landing (you will know what I am talking about when you see it) and birds Dancing.  In the evening, catch the birds landing looking at the sunset.  Be careful about internal lens flare shooting either directly at the sun, or far to the side of the sun.   Reflections off the river with the sunset are great.. Roosts of birds silhouetted against the river in blues purples and reds are great images.  Watch your shutter speed as the light goes down upping your ISO settings all during the evening till you are getting just too much noise.  I find the evening the best for photos, possibly the mornings the best for crane viewing at a blind

 

When to Visit:  There are a few things to consider here. The first is when the cranes will be there.  This past year they arrived 2 weeks early in mid to late February.   Typically they arrive in the beginning of March and leave the beginning of April.  The crane festival is quite popular.  This is the local’s best estimate when the most cranes will be there.  Hotel reservations and blind reservations are difficult to get this time of year.  You might want to consider the phase of the moon in your planning (The Photographers Ephemeris) application on your phone can provide great planning for this based upon your location.  A full moon (or ¾ might be better) provides a great shot if you can get the birds travelling near the moon.  Blind reservations go fast.  In fact there is only a few days to make reservations in the beginning of January at the Rowe Sanctuary.  Make your best guess and plan early.  You can make hotel reservations most any time (except for the crane festival).  

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Technique https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2016/6/photographing-the-annual-sand-hill-crane-migration Thu, 02 Jun 2016 22:15:04 GMT
Creating Long Exposure Fantasy Images https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2016/4/creating-long-exposure-fantasy-images Welcome to Mountain West Photography BLOG!

I'd appreciate your comments and thoughts

I'll be Blogging about How-To and Different Travel Photography thoughts.

Have  you ever seen photographs of flowing streams or waterfalls that look like images from a fantasy land?  Wondered how this was done?  With a little bit of practice, some equipment and a sturdy tripod, you can do this also!

What you will need:

                Camera with a manual setting capability (manual focus, manual exposure)

                Sturdy Tripod

                Filter and filter holder (more about this later)

                Some patience

The process:

                These images are created by taking long exposures.  With the right equipment you can do this in broad daylight! (see the image above)  The equipment isn’t terribly expensive (I’ll give some suggestions ) and the setup is very quick.  First you’ll need to set up you camera on a sturdy tripod. You’ll be taking 10 – 30 second long images.  

  • You’ll need to assure that the tripod is stable.  With these long of exposures, wind, moving decks etc.. will all effect the sharpness of your image.
  •  I’d start your image planning using Aperture priority on your camera.  You’ll need to set the aperture to get the desired depth of field (e.g. what is in focus and what is out of focus).  The higher the aperture, the more that is in focus.  Most of the time you can check this with a Depth of Field preview button on your DSLR. 
  • You will also need to put your camera in manual focus mode.  There won’t be enough light for your camera to meter or to focus once you use the filter.
  • Once you have this selected  you have a few other settings to consider (these are not required if you don’t know how to adjust them). 
    • The first is long exposure noise reduction.  When taking longer shots this is often beneficial to turn on.  However this may end up softening your image a bit.  If you are used to correcting noise in your photo editing program, I’d recommend ignoring this. 
    • The second is Vibration reduction or VR.  If it is a little windy, or you are using a telephoto, consider keeping this on.  Most modern lenses can sense when they are on a tripod anyway and can turn off the NR.  If  you are getting vibration.. this is reasonable to turn on.  If  you have an older lens with VR they can often “seek” looking for vibrations that aren’t there.  If you have this issue and there is little environmental vibration, you can turn this off
    • Image quality:  I always shoot in RAW.  It provides the best opportunity for editing after the images are complete.  I stay away from JPEG for editing as this is a compressed format.  You lose detail, sharpness, and ability to recover details in the shadows when you use jpeg.  It is a great format for the web, inclusion in documents etc.  Just not for editing.
  • Take some test shots to get your basic shutter speed and depth of field correct. Remember your shutter speed, aperture and ISO setting.
  •  Change to Manual exposure and reselect your final settings from before.
  • Now you are ready for the filter holder.  You’ve most likely seen screw on filters that attach to the front of your lens. I use two types of ND filters.  My original one I use is a bit different and are often square or rectangular.  These filter holders can hold up to three filters at a time and are typically large enough (100mm+) to fit on most of your lenses.  I use a Cokin “Z” holder (see below) and an adapter ring (you will need one for each size of lens you have.  Prices vary of course but the holder goes for about $55 and an adapter ring was ~$44.  Nikon lenses often uses 77mm and I have just one for most of my lenses.  There are many other options for filter holders and sizes.  Just get one that fits your camera and meets your price range.  There are many other types of filters that can be purchased such as colored filters and Graduated ND filters.  With today’s post processing capability, I’ve seen most people use the holders for the solid and graduated neutral density filters.  When looking for filters, some can create a color cast, typically blue or brown.  Though this can be fixed easily in post processing it is good to get a high quality filter that has a minimal color cast added to your images.  My new filter is a screw on filter made by Hoya: Hoya Filter on Amazon  This is a great little filter, easier to use and provides 1.5 - 9 stops of light reduction!!!  This is much smaller and easier to use than my origional solution.

     Filter holder                                                  Lens Adapter                   

           Solid 10x ND Filter

  • Next is the filter.  I have two. The first is a 100mm Neutral Density 1000 Square filter.  It is made of optical glass and provides a 10 stop reduction in light.  The second is a ND100 which provides 3 stops of light reduction.  .  My 10x  filter cost $60 as it was glass.  There are others that are of course cheaper.
  • Attach the filter adapter ring to the front of  your camera.  Attach the filter holder onto the adapter. 
  • Once you put the filter in the holder, you won’t be able to see much at all.  Make sure again, you have selected manual focus and manual exposure.
  • You’ll need to calculate the new exposure time with the filter.  I recommend that you adjust shutter speed and ISO sensitivity and leave your Aperture alone.  This will assure you get the desired depth of field.
  • The table below gives you the conversions for 10x, 6x, and 3x filters.  To get beautiful rivers and waterfalls your times should be in the 10 – 30 second range.  A typical sunny days is F8 at 1/125th of a second at ISO 100.  This  will convert to about 8 seconds with a 10x ND filter.
  • Put the filter into place into the holder covering the lens opening.  And take a test image.  You will need to make some adjustments.  Different times provide different effects.  Again, I recommend you adjust the times between 10 and 30 seconds and your ISO sensitivity.  You will typically be moving this to a lower number 100, 64,etc.. to get the maximum time. You can adjust this up however if you find you are taking images in a dim setting.   
  • I find I often don’t have enough hands to hold the filter, adjust settings, and move the camera on the tripod.  A clean cloth (microfiber) is convenient to have to hold the filter while you make other adjustments.
  • Try multiple angles, multiple exposures, multiple times to get the effect you want.  Remember, try to look at your histogram on your display and eliminate how much of your image is clipped in the highlights or right hand side.  You can often recover some shadows in post processing.  It is near impossible to recover “blown highlights”
  • Some notes:
    •   Filter holders can often create an effect called Vignetting.  If you purchase a filter holder that is much larger (e.g. say 165 or 200mm) then you won’t get this effect but everything is more expensive.  Vignetting is a darkening of the corners.  As the filter holder will stick out in front of the lens, wider angles can often see this darkening or black corners.  Make sure you look for this in your images and if  you use a zoom, zoom out include a bit of area that you can “sacrifice” during processing.
    • Consider using a “cable release” or “remote release” on  your camera to minimize camera shake when you take a picture.  These aren’t too expensive. There are many types from the very simple to much more complex intervelometers.  Check these out on the web.  You’ll need one that fits your specific camera.
    • Shutter Speed

      10

      6

      3

      1/8000

      1/8

      1/125

      1/1000

      1/4000

      1/4

      1/60

      1/500

      1/2000

      1/2

      1/30

      1/250

      1/1000

      1

      1/15

      1/125

      1/500

      2

      1/8

      1/60

      1/250

      4

      1/4

      1/30

      1/125

      8

      1/2

      1/15

      1/60

      16

      1

      1/8

      1/30

      30

      2

      1/4

      1/15

      60

      4

      1/2

      1/8

      120

      8

      1

      1/4

      240

      16

      2

      1/2

       

      30

      4

      1

       

      60

      8

      2

       

      120

      16

      4

       

      240

      30

      8

       

       

      60

      16

       

       

      120

      30

       

       

      240

      60

       

       

       

      120

       

       

       

      240

       

       

       

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mountainwestphotography@comcast.net (Mountain West Photography) Technique https://www.mountainwestphotography.com/blog/2016/4/creating-long-exposure-fantasy-images Sat, 30 Apr 2016 18:12:52 GMT